Myddfai – St Michael’s church

History

The nave and chancel of the church of St. Michael in Myddfai were erected at the end of the thirteenth or the beginning of the fourteenth century. Around the 1500, the building was enlarged by a northern nave, and in the seventeenth century by a porch. In the 19th century, during the renovation, the sacristy and the western bellcote were added.

Architecture

The medieval church consisted of a rectangular nave and narrower and lower chancel on the eastern side. On the north side, at the turn of the 15th and 16th centuries, a rectangular northern nave was added, which, interestingly, received from the east its own chancel, with proportions similar to the southern one. The original, medieval windows were made of red sandstone, which distinguishes them from the early modern gray sandstone. Inside the church, the original pillars and arcades and the medieval roof truss are noteworthy. The whole church is distinguished by an extensive spatial program, rich as for a village temple located away from large urban centers.

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bibliography:
Wooding J., Yates N., A Guide to the churches and chapels of Wales, Cardiff 2011.
Website britishlistedbuildings.co.uk, Church of St Michael A Grade I Listed Building in Myddfai, Carmarthenshire.
Website coflein.gov.uk, St Michael’s church, Myddfai.